ILP

Smith Mountain Gets A New 30-year License

Yesterday, FERC issued a new 30-year license to American Electric Power (AEP), a subsidiary of Appalachian Power Company, for continued operation of the 636 MW Smith Mountain Project.

However the new license will be effective only after the current license expires on March 31, 2010. 

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Panel Recommends Studying Downstream Impacts in Merced River Relicensing

A panel formed to investigate the study related disputes in the relicensing of Merced River projects has found that FERC erred in limiting the geographic area which needed to be studied for impacts from the project.

The three-person panel was formed after the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the California State Water Resources Control Board did not agree with FERC’s previous determination and asked for a formal dispute resolution.

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Using FERC's ILP to Develop Cultural Resource Management For The Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Project in Montana

Source: 
Waterpower XVI
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s Integrated Licensing Process (ILP) is the newest licensing process for hydroelectric projects and is being implemented around the US today. The first license application filed under the ILP was submitted in December, 2006 by PPL Montana for the Mystic Lake Hydroelectric Project. The identification, evaluation and management of archaeological and historical (cultural) resources is an essential element of all hydroelectric licensing studies today. This paper details how the management of these non-renewable resources was made a part of the ILP on the Mystic Lake Project.  

Author(s): 

James Shive

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Regulatory Considerations in the Use of the ILP in Developing New Hydroelectric Projects

Source: 
Waterpower XVI
Year: 
2009
Abstract: 

Introduction:FERC’s Integrated Licensing Process (ILP) is applicable to both relicensing existing hydroelectric projects and developing new projects. FERC’s ILP was developed during a period when there were few applications being filed for new projects. Although applications for relicensings may likely continue to outnumber applications for new projects, the complexity and number of new projects being pursued into licensing has increased significantly in the past two years. New projects today include conventional small and medium-sized hydroelectric projects. Many are multiple use water and energy projects, which can be bundled with pumped storage and transmission. There are also growing numbers of new hydroelectric based technologies such as tidal and wave energy projects that require licensing and often multiple agency approvals. 

Author(s): 

Kirby Gilbert

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