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Case StudiesRecommended readingTribal Resources
Published  2/1/2022
ABSTRACT: Since the early 1900s, more than 1700 dams have been removed from rivers in the United States. Native American Tribes have played a key role in many significant removals, bringing cultural, economic, and legal resources to bear on the process. Their involvement contrasts with the displacement and marginalisation that have historically characterised the relationship […]
Recommended reading
Published  6/30/2013
This article by Thomas O’Keefe in Mountaineer magazine explores the history of Elwha River dams, from the geology of the Elwha River through dam construction to dam removal and the ongoing river restoration. An additional feature by Rob Casey discusses some of the recreational opportunities that exist on the now-reconnected river.
HRC or member-contributed
Recommended reading
Published  10/31/2013
Learn more about the history of the Elwha River dams, the challenging removal process, and some of the incredible early restoration progress post-dam removal. “Dams were once thought of as permanent features on the landscape, but the Elwha shows us that these projects do in fact have a finite lifetime. Many dams provide important benefits for our communities — electricity, […]
HRC or member-contributed
Comments & FilingsLaws, court cases, and filings
Published  12/21/1994
Comments from American Whitewater Affiliation on the Elwha River Ecosystem Restoration Draft Environmental Impact statement (DEIS). “AWA believes that removal of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams is important both as: 1) a benefit to restoring the Elwha, and 2) a much needed national policy regarding future dam removals.”
Comments & FilingsLaws, court cases, and filings
Published  1/26/1986
Read the 1986 Motion for Intervention of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe in the Elwha and Glines Canyon projects. “Under such circumstances it does not seem prudent for the Tribe to continue a relatively “low profile” with regard to the fate of these dams. It is therefore the position of the Lower Elwha Tribe, after […]
HRC or member-contributed
Case StudiesHydro guidesTools and guides
Published  1/31/2021
The River Access Planning Guide is a resource for planners, river managers, and users as they design new river access sites, improve existing access, or integrate river access into larger infrastructure projects. The information provided in the guide is intended to provide advice and direction for those involved in river access development and can help facilitate […]
Recommended reading
Published  4/21/2020
Since the removal of two dams on the Elwha River in the Pacific Northwest, salmon are spawning once again, animals large and small are returning to the river banks, and hundreds of acres of barren former lakebed are greening.
HRC or member-contributed
Hydro guides
Published  11/8/2015
This guide explains how to effectively participate in the hydropower licensing process, geared towards citizens. This A to Z description of the licensing process includes an overview of FERC; in-depth guidance for the ILP, TLP, and ALP; and settlement agreements. The appendices provide a compendium of court cases commonly cited in licensing decisions, common filings […]
HRC or member-contributed
Videos
Published  12/31/2019
Less than six years ago, the second of two dams on the Elwha River, on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, was taken out to provide access for fish to the upper river located in the Olympic National Park. Since then, we have witnessed a remarkable transformation of the river – and of the wildlife that depend on it. Before the dams were installed in the early 1900s, the Elwha produced consistent and robust runs of salmon and steelhead and was a productive fishery. Afterwards, these runs dwindled almost to nothing.
HRC or member-contributed
Recommended reading
Published  11/30/2011
Restore is a special publication of the Hydropower Reform Coalition, which provides an overview of dam removal nationally, and documents past, current, and planned removals in the Pacific Northwest.