Lower Snake River dam removal is a golden key, if not a silver bullet

Lower Snake River dam removal is a golden key, if not a silver bullet

Salmon return to the Columbia River in this 2104 photo of the fish viewing window at Bonneville Dam, the first of eight dams salmon and steelhead from the Snake River basin must pass on their way home to spawn. Removing the four dams on the lower Snake River would give these migratory fish a fighting … Read more

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The Snake River basin is a climate-change refuge for migrating salmon and steelhead

The Snake River basin is a climate-change refuge for migrating salmon and steelhead

The equation is simple. It’s hot. It’s going to get hotter, which is why it is so urgent to increase access for salmon and steelhead to the thousands of square miles of the most climate-resilient, high-elevation habitat in the Snake River basin by removing the lower four Snake River dams

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Debunking the ‘it’s the ocean’ excuse to protect Snake River dams

Debunking the ‘it’s the ocean’ excuse to protect Snake River dams

The Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Wikimedia Commons photo. Science tells us that the best way to recover Snake River salmon and steelhead is to restore and reconnect inland habitat Editor’s note: This is the second in a six-part series focusing the plight facing Snake River salmon and steelhead and the scientific evidence that … Read more

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The science is clear: Snake River dams kill too many fish

The science is clear: Snake River dams kill too many fish

If you’re wondering why salmon and steelhead populations in the Snake River are in trouble, the answer is obvious to me and many, many other scientists working on this issue. It’s the four dams on the lower Snake and the reservoirs behind them: They kill too many fish