Hydrokinetic Recreation Guide

Hydrokinetic Recreation Guide

The Hydrokinetic Energy Projects & Recreation: A Guide to Assessing Impacts, or the MHK Recreation Guide, provides general information about hydrokinetic technologies and the permitting process, identifies potential recreational concerns, and suggests ways to study and mitigate those impacts. 

Skagit River Project

Skagit River Project

The Skagit River basin is the largest drainage in Puget Sound, covering 3,140 square miles and representing a unique regional and national resource. Over 158 miles of river including its major tributaries are federally protected Wild and Scenic reaches. Its upper watershed is deeply embedded in the spectacular North Cascades National Park [pictured at right]. Within the Park, the Ross Lake National Recreation Area immediately surrounds 35 miles of Skagit River, surrounding Seattle City Light’s hydroelectric project.

Pit 1, and Pit 3, 4, and 5 Projects

Pit 1, and Pit 3, 4, and 5 Projects

The Pit River is the largest river in northeastern California; its watershed is 4,324 square miles. The mainstem Pit flows in a southwesterly direction through valleys and basalt canyons to Shasta Lake, where it eventually flows into the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay.

Rock Creek-Cresta Project

Rock Creek-Cresta Project

The North Fork Feather originates near the southern boundary of Lassen Volcanic National Park and flows generally southward. The West Branch and North, Middle, and South Forks of the Feather River join underneath Lake Oroville to form the Feather River, a tributary of the Sacramento River. Before dams obstructed the way, the Feather River and its forks were well- known as major salmon rivers, documented as early as the 1840s.